California Institute of Technology
Collections

 

Our Collections
· Manuscripts
· Photographs & Images
· Oral Histories
· Digital Media Collection
· Online Exhibits
· Books & Texts
· Audio Visual
· Scientific Artifacts
· Fine Art

 

image

Charles Richter 1920s. Photo ID 1.46.1-1

 

Caltech

 

Online Exhibits Collection

50 years ago, the emotion of Commencement

Speaker Frank Stanton addressing the 1965 graduating class. Photo credit: James McClanahan
The pomp and cheerful animation of commencement ceremonies mark an important milestone for students and their families, who savor the culmination of years of hard work, and the beginning of a new phase of life.
In celebration of this year's Commencement, the Caltech Archives are pleased to present a photographic gallery of the 1965 Commencement exercises, performed during the tenure of President Lee A. DuBridge. The speaker that year was Frank Stanton, president of CBS at the time.
Although many things have changed in the last 50 years, we believe that the class of 2015 will recognize themselves in the youthful enthusiasm of their 1965 predecessors and we congratulate this and all generations of outstanding Caltech graduates. Visit the online exhibit here. EP

[We would appreciate your help in identifying any of the people seen in this online exhibit; please free to contact us] 6/10/2015

Einstein at Caltech

Einstein lecturing at the offices of the Mt. Wilson Observatory (Carnegie Institution, Pasadena).
Photo ID 1.8-2

In collaboration with the Einstein Papers Project, the Caltech Archives has mounted an exhibit honoring the centenary of Einstein's publication of the theory of general relativity in 1915. The display focuses on Einstein's visits to Caltech in the early 1930s during which he discussed the implications growing out of the theory of relativity with scientists in Pasadena, both at Caltech and at the Mount Wilson Observatory. The California public and press, while understanding little of the science, were lavish in their attention to the world's most famous scientist. Visit the online exhibit here. Posted 3-27-2015 and 5-29-20155/29/2015

 

 


Archimedes and the Recovery of Greek Mathematics

Early printed editions of classical Greek mathematics from the Caltech Archives’ collection are on exhibit from April 7 through July 31, 2014. Beginning with the first edition of the complete known works of Archimedes in both Greek and Latin published in Basel in 1544, the display includes 16th-century Italian editions of Euclid and Archimedes that were used by Galileo in his mathematical studies.

The first English translation of Euclid’s Elements from 1570 and editions of Archimedes and Apollonius of Perga published in the 18th century by the Oxford press are shown, as well as the 17th-century French edition of Diophantus of Alexandria’s Arithmetica—the work that inspired Pierre de Fermat’s last conjecture. The Caltech exhibit complements the Huntington Library’s “Lost & Found: The Secrets of Archimedes” (March 15-June 22, 2014).

 

Olympians of Science: A Display of Medals and Awards
Caltech's scientists and engineers have won a magnificent array of prizes. The bar was set high by Robert A. Millikan, George Ellery Hale and Arthur Amos Noyes—the triumvirate of Caltech's founding fathers. Millikan won Caltech's first Nobel Prize in 1923. Today the Institute claims 31 Nobel laureates from the ranks of its faculty and alumni. But there are other stellar awards, decorations and citations to be celebrated, many of them embodied in visually striking form or presented under deeply memorable circumstances. The display provides a close-up view of some of these grand marks of distinction, drawn from collections in the Caltech Archives.

Documenting Earthquakes: A Virtual Exhibit
In honor of the centennial of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, the Caltech Archives created a virtual exhibit in six parts of materials from its own collections. Recent major donations by Professor George W. Housner have substantially augmented the Archives' holdings in the history of earthquakes and the early science of seismology.

The Gnome Club: a Visual History
The Gnome Club (Kappa Gamma Fraternity) was founded on March 9, 1897. Until the opening of the first student houses in 1931 ended its official operation, it was one of five local fraternities active at Caltech. The strong loyalty and friendship of early Gnomes helped to revive the club in 1949. Today, the Gnomes are a continuing presence at Caltech, serving the community through the Alumni Association, SURF, Caltech Y, the Gnome scholarship program, and other activities. The Gnome Club exhibit provides viewers with a glimpse into the club's rich history.

The Wouk Exhibit
Victor Wouk, Caltech alumnus (MS '40, PhD '42) and pioneer in electric and hybrid vehicle development, and his brother Herman, the noted author, came to Caltech on April 1 4, 2004 to celebrate Herman's new novel, A Hole in Texas, and Victor's donation of his papers to the Caltech Archives. Victor Wouk also established the Victor and Joy Wouk grants-in-aid program to provide support for research in the Wouk collection. A virtual exhibit memorialized the event.

Scientific Instruments Ancient and Modern
A prior Reading Room exhibit celebrated the 25th year of the Caltech Archives in 1993. It featured scientific instruments and other Archives' treasures, ranging from an Egyptian plumb bob to 20th-century experimental apparatus made in the Caltech shops.

©2015 California Institute of Technology. All Rights Reserved.   last update: 06/15/2015
| Site Map | Privacy Notice

 

 

go to the Caltech Archives home page